Staunton’s Lost Architecture

12-14 S AUGUSTA – 1981

Hogshead & Alexander Building

As noted in Jewish Merchants of Downtown Staunton, By Ruth Chodrow and Karen Lynne Johnston, Joseph Barth and Abraham Weinberg became business partners after consolidating their clothing stores in 1911.  Their new store was located in the Hogshead and Alexander Building designed by T.J. Collins Architect and Son.

This commercial building with Classical Revival characteristics was designed with a three-part composition.  The façade included an ornate classical cornice, a large segmental arch window opening with a keystone on the second floor, and masonry corner quoins. Prism glass transom panels surrounded by cast iron and terracotta trim, top the original curved glass, marble base storefront.

Prism glass is an architectural feature utilized to refract and reflect sunlight into the store. Many downtown buildings retain prison glass transoms although many are painted. Uncovering blocked prism glass and other windows not only enhances storefronts, but also allows the use of natural light to illuminate the customer experience and reduce energy costs.

This building also included significant interior details such as an ornate ceiling and a second-floor light well with a balcony.

By 1976, “modernization” had obscured the second-floor window glass and the flat awning-covered galvanized iron ornamental trim. The photos taken by HSF staff, document the demolition in 1981.

12-14 S AUGUSTA – DEMOLITION – 1981

12-14 S AUGUSTA – DEMOLITION – 1981


112-114 W. Frederick St. 

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION:  After 1929

BUSINESS HISTORY:  Eyewear Shop

DEMOLITION DATE: Unknown

PHOTO:  HSF Archives

WHAT’S THERE NOW? Empty Lot


113-115-117 Middlebrook Avenue

Eureka Milling and Ice Cream

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION:  1921

BUSINESS HISTORY:  (1921) Eureka Milling and Ice Cream Co.; (1929) Staunton Creamery

DEMOLITION DATE: Unknown

PHOTO:  HSF Archives

WHAT’S THERE NOW? Empty lot (next to Sunspots parking lot).


12-14 North Central Avenue

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION:  1891-1894

BUSINESS HISTORY:  (1894) print shop.  (1904) Staunton Dispatch and News.  (1914) Daily News. (1921) News Leader.  (1929) Paint Store

DEMOLITION DATE: Fall 1982

PHOTO:  HSF Archives

WHAT’S THERE NOW? Parking Lot


Shannon Hill/College Park

WHAT WAS IT? Our Lady of Angels Monastery. Used as a seminary for training priests. It had 80 rooms on 12.5 areas.
HOW OLD WAS IT? Dedicated in September 1945.
DEMOLITION? After 1970.
WHAT’S THERE NOW? Housing Development.

PHOTO:  HSF Archives


Train Depot

HOW OLD IS IT? Designed by Francis E. Baldwin and erected in 1883. Photo was taken in the 1890’s.
WHAT WAS IT? Built for the B&O Valley Railroad Line.
WHAT’S THERE TODAY? Route 220 passes under the arch where Richmond Road turns in front of The Villages.
DEMOLTION:  Station line was abandoned.


2-4 West Beverley Street

(map)

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION: 1877-1884

BUSINESS HISTORY: (1886) bank. Remodeled by TJ Collins & Son.

DEMOLITION DATE: June 1981

WHAT’S THERE NOW? Sun Trust Bank


Steele’s Tavern – 19 West Johnson Street

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION:  1904

BUSINESS HISTORY:  Originally built as a saloon.  (1914) barber shop. (1921) auto sales. (1929) restaurant/saloon.

DEMOLITION DATE: 1986

PHOTO:  HSF Archives


Hogshead Building

32-38 NORTH CENTRAL AVENUE (formerly known as Water Street)

DATE OF CONSTRUCTION:

BUSINESS HISTORY:  Original site of the city market. (1884-1914) Black public school. (1915) addition built. (1921-1929) used as an office and store.  At some point an Elks Lodge, and a bowling alley.

DEMOLITION DATE: 1982

PHOTO:  HSF Archives